IN THE MEDIA: SmolenPlevy Principals On Air to Discuss Sharing Your Child’s Expenses After Divorce

It’s back-to-school season, and for divorced or separated parents, the question is: Who is paying for the expensive TI-84 calculator their child needs for class? Alan Plevy is featured on WTOP and Mandy Walker’s popular Since My Divorce blog to weigh in on what is covered with child support and how parents can decide who will pay for out-of-pocket expenses. Kyung (Kathryn) Dickerson shares her own insights on these complex family law issues on WUSA 9’s Great Day Washington.

Child support doesn’t cover the costly tab of #2 pencils, paper, clothes and computers, which runs on average about $600 per child, adding more stress to what can already be a tense situation between parents. Plevy says cooperation goes a long way to helping exes–and their children handle back-to-school season.

Plevy says there are typically two ways parents can decide to handle back-to-school expenses: Split the expenses down the middle, or use the same income ratios often used for reimbursement for medical expenses. “For instance, one parent may have 66 percent of the income, so one parent pays 66 percent of the cost, and the other pays 33 percent of the cost.”

For divorced or separated parents struggling to provide normalcy for their children, “This actually forces the parents to come together and try to talk about these expenses,” Plevy said. “Sometimes they’re able to do it, sometimes they’re not, but if they’re not it’s really the children who suffer.”

Listen to Alan Plevy on WTOP Radio and on the popular podcast Since My Divorce:

Watch Kathryn Dickerson on WUSA 9’s Great Day Washington: 

 

On Air: WTOP Interviews Alan Plevy About Navigating Divorce During the Holidays

Divorce is difficult for children and their parents any time of the year, but the holidays can be particularly challenging. News radio WTOP turns to SmolenPlevy Co-founding Principal Alan Plevy for insights on how divorced or separated parents can reduce tension levels during the season.

Plevy says parents should keep the lines of communication open and try to work out details about times and days the children will spend with each parent.It’s important to put these agreements in writing, either by email or texts, so there are no misunderstandings. Another helpful tip: don’t get into a “can-you-top-this” gift battle. Plevy also suggests parents create new holiday traditions, such as volunteering at a homeless shelter, going ice skating or making reservations at one of their favorite restaurants. And finally, Plevy says pay special attention to how you, family members, and friends talk publicly about the other parent.

Plevy explains that “It’s really a holiday for the children, so we want to eliminate as much stress as possible for the children.”

Listen to Plevy on WTOP Radio below:

 

In the Media: Kyung Dickerson Discusses ‘Cyberspying’ on WTOP

Kyung (Kathryn) Dickerson Discusses Cyberspying on WTOP Divorce often brings out the worst in people, but ‘cyberspying’ shows how low they can go. SmolenPlevy principal Kyung (Kathryn) Dickerson discusses the disturbing new trend on air with WTOP.

Cyberspying occurs when one parent uses technology to spy on the other parent while he or she has custody of the child. It can be as simple as forcing the child to Skype or FaceTime when the other spouse has custody, or as complex as planting a tracking device in the child’s shoelaces.

Angry and suspicious parents fail to realize how much cyberspying affects the children who are caught in the crossfire.

“The worst part of it all is, the children are put right in the middle of the debate,” says Dickerson. “As the children get older and are aware of what’s going on, that’s really not healthy for the children.”

Listen to Dickerson discussing cyberspying on air below.

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Part 2: